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 American Eskimo Dog Rescue &  American Eskimo Dog Sanc
tuary   
American Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog SanctuaryAmerican Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog SanctuaryAmerican Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog Sanctuary American Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog Sanctuary American Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog Sanctuary American Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog Sanctuary American Eskimo dog Rescue and Dog Sanctuary of Iowa Pictures of American Eskimo Dogs, Information on American Eskimo Dogs, Adoption Of American Eskimo Dogs, and American Eskimo dog Sanctuary

Dedicated to rescue & sanctuary of American Eskimo Dog "Eskie" Dog.
 
A state licensed and insured, non-profit organization affiliated with Heart Bandits American Eskimo Dog Rescue.
Our goal is to never say "No" to a homeless American Eskimo Dog again

State of Iowa Animal Welfare License # 0009168-00

American Eskimo Rescue and Sanctuary of Iowa is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization

For American Eskimo Dog rescue emergencies in Iowa please call
641-764-2925 
All others please use this "Contact us" form

Hours: By Appointment Only


2014 American Eskimo Dog Calendar


Click Here

More Pictures!

Abby's page

Thinking of getting rid of your pet?
 See this news report first <Click Here

                                                     Click here to visit  WOI TV Des Moines

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American Eskimo Rescue and Sanctuary of Iowa
2567 Kennedy St.
St. Charles, IA 50240
Hours: By Appointment Only

 

 


Click Here To See The Video

In Memory of Smilin Bart

In memory of Missy

Pesty the Eskie Comics

A Little Poem

Last year we averaged a population here at the Iowa Eskie Spa and Resort of 19 Eskies per day for the whole year. What does that mean in basic necessities?
12,410 Bowls of food
204 Frontline applications
204 Heartgard treatments
1825 gallons of filtered water
And that is only the basics~!


Your help is need now more than ever!

You can help us help more precious lives in 2014
By making a tax deductible donation

 

Thank you in advance for your much needed help,
  The folks at American Eskimo Dog Rescue and Sanctuary of Iowa. 
 
American Eskimo Rescue and Sanctuary of Iowa is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization

The Eskie Olym-pics

Thor 
Update!

Holiday Dinner 2006

                   

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the New Eskiepeople List!!!!

We have just set up the Eskiepeople list. This list is Freeform for the American Eskimo Dog and their people. Its ok here to chat about the weather, recent news, tell jokes,  post pictures (up to 1mb) and of coarse our American Eskimo Dog or anything else. Meet new friends that share the same love for the American Eskimo breed.  We would also like to encourage the folks that adopt Eskies from us and our volunteers to join. The only rule for this list is to treat each other with the respect and tolerance that our Eskis have for us. To sign up follow this link 

Google Groups Subscribe to Eskiepeople
Email:
Browse Archives at groups.google.com

 

In Loving Memory of Codie Coyote

August 31st 1986 - June 8th 2005

This is the hardest post I have ever had to make.
On Wednesday June 8th at 8:30 am. we lost our first rescue Eskie and the founder of American Eskimo Rescue and Sanctuary of Iowa, Codie Coyote.
He had congestive heart failure for the past 2 years and suffered a stroke last fathers day (2004) he tried to hang on as long as he could but suffered another stroke on Wednesday.
We thank Scott, Jane, Leann and the rest of the folks at Kindness Pet Clinic for their dedication and expertise which allowed Codie to make it as long as he did.
We rescued him at 2 years old and he stayed with us for 16� years.
Because of him hundreds of needy Eskies have been saved. 
Peace to you,
Perry

We have put together a multimedia presentation to remember Codie. (Link below)

 It is produced in Macromedia Shockwave. Most (97%) browsers have flash player built in. If you cant see or hear this, you need to download the player you can visit www.macromedia.com to download the free player. It is about a 2 minute download for the player. If you are using "no flash" or certain ad blocker software, you might have to turn them off.

Codie's Memorial

File size 4.9 MB

 

Missy's Story and Excellent Adventures

        

   We use KINDNESS PET CLINIC    1007 E.  2nd  Ave Indianola, Iowa 
515-961-2501
for our veterinary needs.



Food Meter Update and Information on Donating Food

Dale Earnhardt, Darva Conger, David Blaine, Day of the Dead, Daytona 500, Dean Kamen, Death Penalty, Denisse Richards, Destiny's Child, Detroit Auto Show, Diablo 2, Diet, Digimon, Digital Cameras, Disney, Diwali, DMX, Dogs, Domains, Download, Dr. Dree, Dragonball, Dreamcast, Drudge Report, DVD
Hi Sangha here, The newest edition of the Newsletter will be printed this week.
 This addition contains an extra special edition of my column, Sangha's Sage Symposium and some other stuff too, like a article on therapy dogs by our wonderful west coast correspondent and editor of the Napa Valley Register, Jeannie Claire. And of course, a special exclusive Pesty the Eski comic

If you have signed up for a newsletter you will automatically receive one if not you can sign up by following this link. Newsletter

 I am ready to answer your philosophical questions in my column "Sangha's Sage Symposium" for the next newsletter (SAMPLE) You can E-Mail your philosophical questions to 

.

Introduction to the American Eskimo Dog  

 American Eskimo Dog, breed of domestic dog introduced to the United States from Germany in either the late 19th century or the early 20th century. Despite The American Eskimo Dog resemblance to Inuit sled dog, the American Eskimo dog, nicknamed the Eskie dog,is a spitz type of dog, Modern families of American Eskimo Dogs can be traced to the American Eskimo Dog of the late Stone Age (about 6000 years ago). American Eskimo dogs are intelligent, energetic dogs that typically have bright white coats.

The standard American Eskimo dog weighs 18 to 35 lb and has a shoulder height of 15 to 19 inch
. American Eskimo Dogs belonging to a miniature variety of this breed weigh 10 to 20 lb and are 11 to 14 inch tall. American Eskimo Dogs of the toy-dog variety, which is even smaller than the miniature variety, has been developed, but the Toy American Eskimo Dog is not recognized as a distinct breed by the American Kennel Club.

American Eskimo dog s have wedge-shaped skulls with wide muzzles; oval, dark brown eyes; and triangular, erect ears that are rounded at the top. The American Eskimo dog has a thick double coats that are either pure white or cream colored. The American Eskimo dog s coats are thickest around the neck, where they form a mane like ruff, which is especially obvious on American Eskimo males. the tail is curved and is covered with long hair.

American Eskimo dog s have a good-natured temperament that makes them suitable for many living situations. Because of their high energy, however, American Eskimo Dogs become noisy or destructive if they are forced to be inactive. The American Eskimo Dog is a great companion dog because of their intelligence and eagerness to please. The American Eskimo Dog is rarely used to perform wor
k.
 

Below are American Eskimo dog breed standard descriptions as set fort by the American Kennel Club or A.K.C. and the United Kennel Club or U.K.C. These standards are for American Eskimo dogs that compete for  breed conformation or show quality. They are not meant as a guideline for a pet quality American Eskimo Dog. We in no way use these standards for our rescue or sanctuary. It is our belief that virtually any American Eskimo Dog will make a fine pet and a long lived member of your family, whether its eyes are blue or brown, etc. Once you experience the devotion, unconditional love and respect your Eskie has for his or her family, you will find that in these terms they are incomparable. 

 

A.K.C. Description

The American Eskimo Dog Breed has been accepted into the A.K.C. list of breeds as of  October 11, 1994

Most American Eskimo Dogs are registered with the U.K.C. (United Kennel Club)( U.K.C. Description)

General appearance
The American Eskimo Dog, a loving companion dog, presents a picture of strength and agility, alertness and beauty. It is a small to medium-size Nordic type dog, always white, or white with biscuit cream. 

The American Eskimo Dog is compactly built and well balanced, with good substance, and an alert, smooth gait. The face is Nordic type with erect triangular shaped ears, and distinctive black points (lips, nose, and eye rims). The white double coat consists of a short, dense undercoat, with a longer guard hair growing through it forming the outer coat, which is straight with no curl or wave. The coat is thicker and longer around the neck and chest forming a lion-like ruff, which is more noticeable on dogs than on bitches. The rump and hind legs down to the hocks are also covered with thicker, longer hair forming the characteristic breeches. The richly plumed tail is carried loosely on the back.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Size There are three separate size divisions of the American Eskimo Dog (all measurements are heights at withers): Toy, 9 inches to and including 12 inches; Miniature, over 12 inches to and including 15 inches; and Standard, over 15 inches to and including 19 inches. There is no preference for size within each division. Disqualification: Under 9 inches or over 19 inches. Proportion. Length of back from point of shoulder to point of buttocks is slightly greater than height at withers, an approximate 1.1 to 1 ratio. Substance. The American Eskimo Dog is strong and compactly built with adequate bone.

Head
Expression is keen, intelligent, and alert. Eyes are not fully round, but slightly oval. They should be set well apart, and not slanted, prominent or bulging. Tear stain, unless severe, is not to be faulted. Presence of tear stain should not outweigh consideration of type, structure, or temperament. Dark to medium brown is the preferred eye color. Eye rims are black to dark brown. Eyelashes are white. Faults: amber eye color or pink eye rims. Disqualification: blue eyes. Ears should conform to head size and be triangular, slightly blunt-tipped, held erect, set on high yet well apart, and blend softly with the head. Skull is slightly crowned and softly wedge-shaped, with widest breadth between the ears. The stop is well defined, although not abrupt. The muzzle is broad, with length not exceeding the length of the skull, although it may be slightly shorter. Nose pigment is black to dark brown. Lips are thin and tight, black to dark brown in color. Faults: pink nose pigment or pink lip pigment. The jaw should be strong with a full complement of close fitting teeth. The bite is scissors, or pincer.

Neck, Topline, Body
The neck is carried proudly erect, well set on, medium in length, and in a strong, graceful arch. The topline is level. The body of the American Eskimo Dog is strong and compact, but not cobby. The chest is deep and broad with well-sprung ribs. Depth of chest extends approximately to point of elbows. Slight tuck-up of belly just behind the ribs. The back is straight, broad, level, and muscular. The loin is strong and well-muscled. The American Eskimo Dog is neither too long nor too short coupled. The tail is set moderately high and reaches approximately to the point of hock when down. It is carried loosely on the back, although it may be dropped when at rest.

Forequarters
Forequarters are well angulated. The shoulder is firmly set and has adequate muscle but is not overdeveloped. The shoulder blades are well laid back and slant 45� with the horizontal. At the point of shoulder the shoulder blade forms an approximate right angle with the upper arm. The legs are parallel and straight to the pasterns. The pasterns are strong and flexible with a slant of about 20�. Length of leg in proportion to the body. Dewclaws on the front legs may be removed at the owner's discretion; if present, they are not to be faulted. Feet are oval, compact, tightly knit and well padded with hair. Toes are well arched. Pads are black to dark brown, tough and deeply cushioned. Toenails are white.

Hindquarters
Hindquarters are well angulated. The lay of the pelvis is approximately 30� to the horizontal. The upper thighs are well developed. Stifles are well bent. Hock joints are well let down and firm. The rear pasterns are straight. Legs are parallel from the rear and turn neither in nor out. Feet are as described for the front legs. Dewclaws are not present on the hind legs.

Coat
The American Eskimo Dog has a stand-off, double coat consisting of a dense undercoat and a longer coat of guard hair growing through it to form the outer coat. It is straight with no curl or wave. There is a pronounced ruff around the neck which is more noticeable on dogs than bitches. Outer part of the ear should be well covered with short, smooth hair, with longer tufts of hair growing in front of ear openings. Hair on muzzle should be short and smooth. The backs of the front legs should be well feathered, as are the rear legs down to the hock. The tail is covered profusely with long hair. THERE IS TO BE NO TRIMMING OF THE WHISKERS OR BODY COAT AND SUCH TRIMMING WILL BE SEVERELY PENALIZED. The only permissible trimming is to neaten the feet and the backs of the rear pasterns.

Color
Pure white is the preferred color, although white with biscuit cream is permissible. Presence of biscuit cream should not outweigh consideration of type, structure, or temperament. The skin of the American Eskimo Dog is pink or gray. Disqualification: any color other than white or biscuit cream.

Gait
The American Eskimo Dog shall trot, not pace. The gait is agile, bold, well balanced, and frictionless, with good forequarter reach and good hindquarter drive. As speed increases, the American Eskimo Dog will single track with the legs converging toward the center line of gravity while the back remains firm, strong, and level.

Temperament
The American Eskimo Dog is intelligent, alert, and friendly, although slightly conservative. It is never overly shy nor aggressive, and such dogs are to be severely penalized in the show ring. At home it is an excellent watchdog, sounding a warning bark to announce the arrival of any stranger. It is protective of its home and family, although it does not threaten to bite or attack people. The American Eskimo Dog learns new tasks quickly and is eager to please.

Disqualifications
Any color other than white or biscuit cream
Blue eyes
Height: under 9" or over 19"


Approved: October 11, 1994
Effective: November 30, 1994

 

U.K.C. Description

AMERICAN ESKIMO DOG
Official U.K.C. Breed Standard


History                                                          

The American Eskimo dog is a member of the ancient and wide ranging Spitz family of dogs. One 18th century German historian claimed that the Spitz was the ancestor of all domestic breeds. White Spitzes were popular in Pomerania and in the coastal regions of Germany. Sailors traded the white dogs throughout Europe. When Queen Charlotte of England acquired several white Spitzes, the dogs became fashionable among British aristocrats. White Spitzes appear in several Gainsborough paintings.

German immigrants probably brought the white Spitz dogs to the United States, where they served as watchdogs, family pets, and circus dogs.

Known as the German Spitz in its homeland, the breed was renamed the American Eskimo in 1917. This was probably a reaction to the unpopularity during World War I of anything associated with Germany.

The American Eskimo was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1913.

General Appearance                                                          

The American Eskimo dog is a well balanced, typical model of a working type Spitz dog, ranging in size from 11 to 19 inches. The body is well balanced and proportioned, appearing neither clumsy nor racy. The length of back from withers to set-on of tail is equal to the height from withers to the ground. The head is wedge-shaped, with erect triangular ears, and readily distinguished black points (nose, lips, and eye rims) The American Eskimo dog has a thick, white double coat. The chest, neck, and forepart of the shoulders are typically covered with a lion-like mane. The backs of the forelegs are well feathered. The rump and hind legs down to the hock are covered with thick hair that form the characteristic "trousers." The ruff (mane) and long outer guard hairs are typically more profuse on males than females. The tail is richly plumed and carried over the back. With its alert, smooth carriage, the American Eskimo presents a picture of natural beauty, alertness, strength, and agility.

Characteristics                                                          

The American Eskimo dog is intelligent, alert, and energetic. This breed is loyal and friendly, but can be conservative with strangers. Overly aggressive or overly shy dogs are penalized.

Head                                                          

Head size conforms proportionately to body size. The wedge-shaped head denotes power. The stop is well defined, but not abrupt.

SKULL -- The skull is broad and slightly crowned.

MUZZLE -- The muzzle conforms proportionately to head size and is covered with short, smooth hair. The jaws are strong. Lips are tight and black to dark brown in color.

Faults: Saggy flews; unpigmented lips.

TEETH -- A full complement of sound, white teeth that meet in a scissors bite is preferred. A level bite is permissible.

Faults: Overshot or undershot bite.

NOSE -- The nose leather is black to dark brown.

Fault: Absence of dark pigment

EYES -- The eyes are medium, oval in shape but not slanted. Eyes are dark to medium brown and set well apart, giving an intelligent expression. Eye rims are black to dark brown. Eyelashes are white.

Fault: Unpigmented eyerims.

Disqualification: Blue eyes.

EARS -- Ears conform to head size and blend softly with the wedge-shaped head. The ears are set well apart, and are triangular, slightly rounded at the tips, and held erect. The outer and inner parts of the ear are covered with short, smooth hair, with longer tufts in front of the ear openings. The skin on the inside of the ear is pink or slightly tinged with gray.

Fault: Flop ears.

Neck                                                          

The neck is medium in length, conforming proportionately to the body; strong, carried proudly erect, and blending into the shoulders with a graceful arch.

Forequarters                                                          

The shoulders are laid back at an apparent 45-degree angle and are firmly set. The forelegs are parallel and straight, with strong, flexible pasterns to add spring to movement. The elbows are close to the body, turning neither in nor out. Leg length from elbow to ground is approximately equal to half the dog's height at the withers.

Body                                                          

The body is strong and compactly built, but not too short-coupled. The length of back from withers to set-on of tail is equal to the height from withers to the ground. Females may be slightly longer. The withers are the highest portion of the backline and blend gracefully into the back. The back is straight, level, broad, and muscular. The loins are well muscled and of adequate length to facilitate the easy rhythmic movement and powerful drive of the back legs. The chest is strong, showing broadness and depth. Depth of chest is at approximate point of elbows. The ribs are well sprung and begin an upsweep behind the ninth rib, which assures adequate room for heart and lung action. The belly has a slight tuck up just behind the ribs.

Hindquarters                                                          

The hind legs are muscular and of adequate bone to conform to body size. The upper thighs are well developed and muscled. The stifles lay approximately 30 degrees off the pelvis. The hock joint is sharply defined and the hocks are well let down. When the dog is standing naturally, the hind legs are parallel when viewed from the rear, turning neither in nor out.

Feet                                                          

The feet are compact, oval in shape, and well padded with hair. The pads are tough and deeply cushioned. The feet neither toe in nor out when the dog is standing naturally. Front dewclaws may be removed at the owner's discretion. Rear dewclaws are objectionable and should be removed.

Tail                                                          

The tail is set moderately high and is covered with long, profuse hair. It is carried over the back, not necessarily centered, when the dog is alert or moving. When the dog is relaxed, the tail may drop. When hanging down, the tail bone reaches to the hock joint.

Faults: Tightly curled tail; double hook tail.

Coat                                                          

The body is covered with a soft, thick, short undercoat. Longer guard hair grows through the undercoat to form the outer coat. The guard hair is free of any curl or wave. The mane covering the neck area is noticeably thicker, forming the ruff, which is typically more profuse on males than females. The front of the forelegs are covered with short, smooth hair while the back sides are well feathered. The rump and hind legs down to the hock are covered with thick hair that forms the characteristic "trousers." The tail is richly plumed.

Coat length will vary from dog to dog. Quality is more important than quantity.

Color                                                          

Pure white is most desired. The ONLY other permissible colors are: white with biscuit cream, and cream.

Disqualification: Any color other than those stated above.

Height                                                          

Miniature American Eskimo dog:
Males from 12 inches up to and including 15 inches;
Females from 11 inches up to and including 14 inches.
Puppy class only -- Minimum permissible heights are 11 inches for males and 10 inches for females.

Standard American Eskimo dog:

Males over 15 inches up to and including 19 inches;
Females over 14 inches up to and including 18 inches.

Championship points earned in the miniature classes are valid in combination with points earned in the standard classes.

Gait                                                          

The American Eskimo dog is a trotting breed. The dog does not pace at a trotting speed. The stride is quick, agile, and well timed. The gait, viewed from the side, is efficient, balanced, and vigorous, showing good reach in the forequarters matched with a strong rear action drive in the hindquarters during the trot. When walking, the dog will not single track, or brush, but as speed increases, the legs gradually angle inward until the pads fall on a straight line directly under the longitudinal center of the body. When moving, the topline remains strong, level, and firm.

Faults                                                          

Any departure from the ideal described in this breed standard is faulted to the extent of the deviation. Structural faults common to all trotting breeds are undesirable in the American Eskimo, even though such faults may not be specifically mentioned herein.

Disqualifications                                                          

Unilateral or bilateral cryptorchid. Viciousness or extreme shyness. Blue eyes. Albinism. Blindness. Deafness. Any color other than those stated above. Any alterations of the dog other than allowed by the standard.

american eskimo dog picture site

SCALE OF POINTS


General Appearance

15

Movement

          15

Head

10

Coat

10

Chest and Ribs

10

Forequarters

10

Hindquarters

10

Back

10

Feet/Legs

5

Tail

5

Total

100

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Eskimo_Dog

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